What you should know about LCHF for vegetarians – and GI diets for that matter

LCHF for vegetarians – how does it actually work in practice? LCHF is a diet that has been popular for a long time and now and even LCHF cookbooks for vegetarians is abundant, but do they stay within the range of what is defined as a low carb LCHF diet?

LCHF – if anyone has missed it – stands for Low Carb, High Fat and involves removing the carbs from your diet that can be removed and eat most of your calories in fat. Some authors advocate as much as 75% of the energy intake of fat.

Read more…

Comparison between different flours – which contains most protein and which most carbohydrates?

Is the difference really as large between different types of flours that the debates make you think? Is it really THAT much better baking using dinkel flour than ordinary plain wheat flour? Some recipes seem to think that it’s perfectly fine to throw in a cup sugar or two as long as dinkel flour is used in the recipe. I wonder…

Of course it all depends on what you want to achieve by changing flour. If the aim is to eat a little healthier, with fewer fast carbohydrates there does not seem to be a huge gain by changing stark white plain wheat flour for a whole meal dinkel flour. If you are eating LCHF or a diet restricting carbohydrates you may want to count a bit more carefully.

Plain wheat flour contains 10 g of protein, dinkel flour 13 g. That is 30% more, which sounds like a lot, but in reality it’s 3 g. Does that really make a huge difference? Comparing carbohydrates the difference is even less. Wheat flour contains 73 g and dinkel flour 65 g of carbohydrates, a 12% increase. If you are thinking about switching flour and get some proper effect, you are better off choosing soya flour that contains 37 g protein and 16 g carbohydrates. If you don’t like the extremely disgusting taste (in my humble opinion) of the soya flour, there are other options. Almond flour contains 19 g protein and 6 g carbohydrates, chickpea flour contains 22 g protein and 59 g carbohydrates and coconut flour contains 20 g protein and only 4 g carbohydrates. But, I found both chickpea flour and coconut flour hard to get hold of.

The other option is just to half the amount of bread and cookies you eat, and you solved the problem without burying your head too deeply in the flour bag! 🙂

Comparison flours, g of protein and carbohydrates per 100 g

Plain wheat flour
• Protein 10 g
• Carbohydrate 73 g

Graham flour
• Protein 10 g
• Carbohydrate 61 g

Buckwheat flour
• Protein 7 g
• Carbohydrate 76 g

Dinkel flour or spelt flour, whole meal
• Protein 14 g
• Carbohydrate 59 g

Dinkel flour or spelt flour
• Protein 13 g
• Carbohydrate 65 g

Soya flour
• Protein 37 g
• Carbohydrate 16 g

Oat flour
• Protein 19 g
• Carbohydrate 45 g

Almond flour
• Protein 19 g
• Carbohydrate 6 g

Chickpea flour
• Protein 22 g
• Carbohydrate 59 g

Coconut flour
• Protein 20 g
• Carbohydrate 4 g

Good luck with your baking!
EatMoreVegetarian.com

Lose a few kilo with Allevo. No, wait a minute. Smoothies!

I’ve got a few kilo to lose and put myself on an Allevo diet. The ad said “High protein low calorie” and that sounded good to me. I can add that it’s nothing for LCHF-dieters or GI people since a portion contains 26 g carbohydrates, and that is about a weeks worth of carbs for a LCHF dieter and a days worth for a GI person. In any case I switched a few meals a week for a chocolate shake that is mixed with milk. It felt a bit so-so when i saw the long list of ingredients. Quite a few unknowns and sweeteners! Nothing that sounded particularly healthy.

After a few days I also tired of the chocolate flavour, there are indeed also a strawberry flavour, but synthetically tasting strawberry is something I dislike. I thought “I can do better than this myself!”. I often make smoothies for a snack, since it’s both quick, lovely tasting and healthy and though I can make a protein smoothie that is just as good. Here is the comparison:

Allevo chocolateAllevo chocolate flavour contains:

220 kcal
19 g protein
26 g carbohydrates
3.5 g fat

Smoothie using quark, blueberries and banana contains:

214 kcal
16 g protein
42 g carbohydrates
3 g fat

Smoothie using quark, raspberries and apple contains:

222 kcal
17 g protein
36 g carbohydrates
3 g fat

If you are a calorie counter and want to save 18 calories (!!!) you can use skimmed milk instead, then the figures look like this for the banana smoothie:

Smoothie using quark, blueberries and banana (made with skimmed milk) contains:

196 kcal
16 g protein
43 g carbohydrates
1 g fat

If someone reading this is new to making smoothies, all you need to do is put it all in a mixing bowl, and mix it all together, that’s it. It’s ready to drink. Here are the recipes for which I made the calorie, carbohydrate, fat and protein counts above:

Recipe for Smootie with quark, blueberry and banana

Milk, 1.5 % fat, 150 ml / 3/4 cup
Quark, light 1%, 75 ml / 2 1/2 oz
Bluberries, 2 tbsp
Banana, 1 medium

Recipe for Smoothie with quark, raspberry and apple

Milk, 1.5 % fat, 150 ml / 3/4 cup
Quark, light 1%, 75 ml / 2 1/2 oz
Raspberries, 100 ml / 3 1/2 oz
Apple, 1 medium sized

The natural option contains fewer calories, and will keep you full longer – in my opinion, and more natural ingredients, and you lose the sweeteners in the Allevo drink. You can also vary the taste, which means you won’t give in as easily. Take any fruit and spice it up with finely grated ginger, or cinnamon. Don’t be afraid to experiment, you can’t really go wrong. The smoothie is in my opinion a clear winner!

But, what do you choose?


EatMoreVegetarian.com